Nurse Compton

Nurse Adelia Compton arrived in Chapel Hill on New Year’s Eve, 1923 at the age of 50. Over the next three decades, she expanded access to healthcare for Black people, forced the local government to make much needed infrastructure improvements in Black neighborhoods, and started social welfare programs designed to improve the health of Black children. While the Black community …

Susie Weaver

Bynum & Susie Weaver were pillars of the Chapel Hill-Carrboro African American community, owning three “social enterprises” before the term existed. From a grocery store to funeral services, the Weavers’ businesses provided much needed goods and services to the community, regardless of people’s ability to pay. The couple owned the Chapel Hill Funeral Home and Ambulance Service, Weaver’s Grocery, and …

Walter Riggsbee

Plumber, carpenter and electrician to Orange and Chatham County’s African American Community, Walter Riggsbee owned the building at 111 South Merritt Mill Road with wife Molly, now named “Walt’s Grill.” In the late 1980s 111 South Merritt Mill Road served as a temporary men’s shelter.  Prior to that, it was a church, restaurant, grocery store, and beauty parlor. It is …

Dr. L.H. Hackney

The Rev. Dr. Louis H. Hackney was an 1892 graduate of Shaw University, later being honored with a Doctorate degree. Around the age of 21, he became pastor of the Rock Hill Baptist Church, now known as First Baptist Church. Worship services were previously held in several locations and buildings within Chapel Hill. Rock Hill Baptist Church, the first significant …

Thurman Atkins

Thurman Atkins, Owner Atkins Trucking Co, Hollywood Cab/Carolina Cab and Hollywood Restaurant.  Mr. Atkins grew up in Chapel Hill North’s Mt. Sinai Road community.  Prior to serving in the U. S. Army, he worked for the university.  When he returned from his tour of duty, he chose to try it on his own.  With no store space to set up …

Addie Robinson

Addie Robinson was a beloved community leader, registered nurse, as well as founder and long-time director of Holmes Day Care at Hargraves Community Center, the longest running daycare in Chapel Hill. Mrs. Robinson’s husband, Hubert Robinson, chartered the first Chapel Hill chapter of the NAACP in 1947 and was the first Black member on the Chapel HIll Board of Alderman …

Valerie Paige Foushee

Valerie Foushee is a life-long resident of Orange County and a 1974 graduate of Chapel Hill High School, as well as a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ms. Foushee retired from the Chapel Hill Police Department after 21 years of service. Her political career began when she was elected to the Board of Education for …

Barbara Booth Powell

Barbara Booth Powell began her tenure on Chapel Hill Town Council in 1992. A former Assistant Principal at Guy B. Phillips Junior High School, Booth later served as a community development specialist in state government.  A 1955 graduate of Lincoln High School, Powell often stood in support of Chapel Hill’s lowest paid workers, assisted residents of the Northside and Pine …

Bynum Weaver

Bynum & Susie Weaver were pillars of the Chapel Hill-Carrboro African American community, owning three “social enterprises” before the term existed. From a grocery store to funeral services, the Weavers’ businesses provided much needed goods and services to the community, regardless of people’s ability to pay. The couple owned the Chapel Hill Funeral Home and Ambulance Service, Weaver’s Grocery, and …

Howard Lee

Howard Lee was elected to his first term as Chapel Hill’s mayor only five years after the Federal Civil Rights Act was passed in 1964. Mayor Lee was the first Black man to serve as mayor of a southern city with a majority white population since Reconstruction.  During his tenure, Lee addressed legislators in Washington D.C. convincing them to provide …